National Arthur M. & Berdena King Eagle Scout Scholarship Winners

National Arthur M. & Berdena King Eagle Scout Scholarship Winners

Clicking on the Winner's name you will be shown a page that details the outstanding Young Man.  The winner's essay is also posted for review.

Year State Society Winner Patriotic Theme
2012 - 2013 Florida David C. Hager  
2011 - 2012 Utah Abram M. Weeks  
2010 - 2011 Minnesota Robert Rasmussen Click Here
2009 - 2010 New York David Cadwell Pegado Click Here
2008 - 2009 Michigan Gerrit S. Bakker Click Here
2007 - 2008 Minnesota Paul Banwart  
2006 - 2007 Connecticut Charles C. McBride II  
2005 - 2006 Missouri Michael W. Grogan  
2004 - 2005 Minnesota John R. Rassmussen Click Here

 

2011 National Arthur M. & Berdena King Eagle Scout Scholarship Winner

 

First Place:  Eagle Scout Robert Rasmussen

 

2011 Eagle Scout Winner

 

The SAR Eagle Scout Recognition and Scholarship Program recognizes outstanding Eagle Scouts in our communities. Every SAR chapter sponsors an Eagle Scout Competition that includes an application detailing Scouting experience, academic achievements, and community service, a 500-word essay on a patriotic theme, and a four-generation genealogy chart. The winner of each SAR chapter competition is entered in the SAR state competition. The winner of each state competition competes in the National Society's Eagle Scout Competition and vies for $14,000 in scholarships.

 

You can Read Robert's Patriotic theme here.

2011 Winning Eagle Scout Patriotic Theme

 

The Battle of Guilford Court House

By Robert Rasmussen

Minnesota Society SAR


There was often a fine line between victory and defeat during battles of the Revolutionary War.  In some cases, victory was so muddled it took weeks to sort out the real winner.

Need Evidence?  Consider the Battle of Guilford Court House where American forces retreated and left the British with a battlefield and apparent victory.  In the months that followed, the results became more clear and the battle is remembered as one of the most decisive of the revolution.

The Revolutionary War began in Lexington, Massachusetts in 1775 and for three years, most of the fighting occurred in the northern colonies.  In 1778, the British turned their attention to the south and claimed major victories in Savannah and Charleston.  eager to gain control of the south, British General Charles Cornwallis sought a Climactic battle which would deliver a knockout punch.

American fortunes were in the hands of General Nathanael Greene, who was determined to avoid a battle until his army had reached peak strength.  Having surrendered large areas of land to buy time, Greene was finally ready for the confrontation with Cornwallis and prepared for battle at Guilford Court House inside the present-day city of Greensboro, North Carolina.  Greene commanded a force of 4,400, which included 1,700 Continentals and 2,700 militia.  Although outnumbered with an army of 1,900, Cornwallis was certain the British would overcome the rebels just as they'd done on scores of other battlefields.

On the morning of March 15, 1781, Green deployed his men for three lines of battle.  The fighting began about noon when the British approached the first line, a group of North Carolina militia deployed behind a rail fence.  Although the line quickly collapsed, the militia used a barrage of musket fire to inflict heavy casualties before retreating.

As the British advanced, they faced a greater obstacle in the second line, which was comprised of Virginia militia.  The one-hour skirmish resulted in more losses for the Redcoats, who were finally able to break through and advance toward the final line.  The heaviest fighting took place on the third line, where Greene had stationed his Continentals.  After an exchange of musket fire and a barrage by British cannons, the Americans broke off and retreated from the field.

The entire battle lasted just 90 minutes.  Although the British had technically defeated the Americans, they lost 25 percent of their men and were spread across a large area without food or shelter.  The serious losses of manpower left the British too weak to pursue Greene's "defeated" army and unable to occupy the outposts of North Carolina.  As a result, Cornwallis made the fatal decision to lead his army to Virginia, where seven months later he was defeated at Yorktown.  Conversely, the American force marched south and fought battles that liberated South Carolina and Georgia.

The Battle of Guilford Court House was an important event in the Revolutionary War and showed how victories aren't always what they appear.  For the British, an apparent victory set in motion the consequences of ultimate defeat.  For the patriots, it showed how a short-lived retreat didn't diminish the resolve and spirit of the American people -- attributes which served the colonies well during the revolution and have kept our country strong for future generations.


Bibliography

Smith, C. Carter, The American Revolution.  Millbrook Press, Brookfield, Conn.  1991

Blackwood, Paul E., The American Revolution.  Grosset and Dunlap, New York, N.Y.  1963

Website:  Http://www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Guiilford_Court_House

2010 National Arthur M. & Berdena King Eagle Scout Scholarship Winner

 

First Place:  Eagle Scout David Cadwell Pegado

 

 

The SAR Eagle Scout Recognition and Scholarship Program recognizes outstanding Eagle Scouts in our communities. Every SAR chapter sponsors an Eagle Scout Competition that includes an application detailing Scouting experience, academic achievements, and community service, a 500-word essay on a patriotic theme, and a four-generation genealogy chart. The winner of each SAR chapter competition is entered in the SAR state competition. The winner of each state competition competes in the National Society's Eagle Scout Competition and vies for $14,000 in scholarships.

 

You can Read David's Patriotic theme here.

2010 Winning Eagle Scout Patriotic Theme

                                              

TRIBUTE TO A PRIVATE’S SERVICE  
by David Cadwell Pegado  
EMPIRE STATE SOCIETY

 



Thousands of footsteps echoed in unison as troops marched past. The turncoat from Connecticut, Benedict Arnold, was leading the British occupation of Williamsburg. In April 1781, I was only ten years old, but knew the shrill call of fifes and the beat of drums as our own militia men drilled. I scrambled down from my tree-top vantage point to take action; hurling an apple at a Redcoat, it made a satisfactory thud.   

I quickly disappeared into the crowd.


My immersion into the past at Colonial Williamsburg left a lasting impression. Historical reenactments and preservation sites became my portals to the past, providing first-hand experience of the sights and sounds of the battle for independence. I saw great leaders and unnamed patriots play equally important roles.


My ancestor, John Cadwell, baptized in 1762 in Hartford County, really did grow up amidst revolutionary struggles. Although no battles were fought in Farmington, “years of war left the town exhausted.” 1 Families kept a Continental Fast to save provisions for soldiers and stopped Tories from redirecting supplies to the British.2 They hung traitors’ portraits upside down in rejection. My great-great-great-great grandfather was the same age I am now, in September 1780, when Benedict Arnold’s treasonous scheme at West Point was uncovered.


On March 5, 1782, Parliament agreed to negotiate peace. Connecticut townspeople reacted to the news with “a mixed sensation of pleasure and pain.”3 Nineteen days later, Cadwell enlisted at Farmington and was posted in the area of West Point with the Second Regiment of the Connecticut Line, serving under Colonel Heman Swift.4 Not much military activity occurred during his service. No extraordinary stories of bravery were uncovered, but his assignment fulfilled an important role. Defense of the strategic Hudson Highlands remained a priority. His regiment made encampments in Connecticut Village and Nelson’s Point and may have helped close-down the northern division’s largest and most important provisions hub, the Fishkill Supply Depot. On July 28, 1782, Swift’s regiment began guard duty of King’s Ferry, the Hudson crossing at Verplanck’s Point. With the British still holding New York downriver, King’s Ferry was a critical stronghold and potential target. Cadwell likely witnessed the arrival of 12,000 of Washington’s and Rochambeau’s troops preparing to converge on New York for a final show of strength.5 Two months into his service, May 1782, the Second Regiment revolted from the “daily routine of a seldom paid and poorly supplied army” 6, but were soon suppressed. Unpaid salaries and scant food prompted the Connecticut Mutiny; on March 15, 1783, near the end of John Cadwell’s service, a widespread revolt among Continental troops erupted. His civilian life in the fledgling republic must also have been difficult, describing himself as “indigent” in his 1818 pension application.


“Occasionally in the study of history we find an 'unknown' man, a man who has received no recognition from his countrymen, yet is justly deserving of it.” 7 These words described Colonel Swift, but I believe they ring true for Private John Cadwell and countless other soldiers whose contributions must be searched out to be remembered. Interactive opportunities and research gave me awareness and appreciation of my ancestor’s struggles. In piecing together the path of one long-forgotten patriot, a link connecting our past with the future was preserved.


End Notes

  1. “Farmington Historical Society.” Farmington’s Heritage. December 20, 2009.
  2. “The Tories of Connecticut.” Connecticut Quarterly. Vol. 1 No. 3. December 20, 2009.
  3. “History of Farmington.” Farmington Historical Society. December 20, 2009.
  4. Revolutionary War Pension File #S44365
  5. “Kings Ferry, NY.” Kings Ferry, New York. December 21, 2009.
  6. Furlong, Patrick J. “A Sermon for the Mutinous Troops of the Connecticut Line, 1782.” New England Quarterly 43 (December, 1970) :621-30.
  7. “Washington’s Colonel Heman Swift, 1733-1814.” The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. December 24, 2009.

Works Cited
 

 



Special thanks for Research Assistance from:


Rich Malley, Diana McCain, Nancy Finlay at the Connecticut Historical Society, Hartford, CT
Jack Hale, Martin Byster at the Van Wyck Homestead Museum, Fishkill, NY

2009 National Arthur M. & Berdena King Eagle Scout Scholarship Winner

 

First Place:  Eagle Scout Gerrit S. Bakker

Louisville, KY - The Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) will present its coveted "Arthur M. & Berdena King Eagle Scout Scholarship Award" to Eagle Scout Gerrit S. Bakker on Monday, July 6, 2009 in ceremonies at the 119th Annual SAR Conference in Atlanta, Georgia. As the National First Place winner, Bakker will receive an $8,000 college scholarship. Bakker represented the state of Michigan in the national competition after winning the Michigan Society SAR competition which earned him a college scholarship of $1,000, a SAR Eagle Scout Medal and an Eagle Trophy designating him as Michigan's winner. The presentation of the Michigan awards was on Saturday, April 18, 2009 at the Michigan Society SAR Annual Conference in Lansing, Michigan. Bakker is believed to be the youngest ever winner of the National Award.

2009 Eagle Scout Winner

Eagle Scout Gerrit S. Bakker, is the son of Steve and Kristin Bakker of Alma, Michigan and Denise Bakker of Williamston, Michigan. He is a member of the Lake Huron Area Council of the Boy Scouts of America and registered in Troop 631 at the Ithaca United Methodist Church in Ithaca, Michigan and Venturing Crew 7603 at the Alma Elks Club in Alma, Michigan. In addition to earning the highest rank in the Boy Scouts of America, Bakker has earned 71 Merit Badges and seven Eagle Scout Palms. His Eagle Scout Project provided over 100 hours of combined scout and adult efforts to start a battery recycling program for the City of Ithaca. His other community service includes having built loon nesting islands to help restore and increase Michigan's common loon population, participating in local food drives, volunteering as a camp counselor at summer camp and assisting in activities at the Ithaca Senior Activity Center. He is also a member of the Gratiot County Community Foundation's Youth Advisory Council.

Bakker is a freshman at Ithaca High School and an honor student. He is a member of the Ithaca High School Marching and Jazz Bands, freshman basketball team, varsity soccer team and the Model UN team. He is also a member of St. Paul's Catholic Church in Ithaca.

The SAR Eagle Scout Recognition and Scholarship Program recognizes outstanding Eagle Scouts in our communities. Every SAR chapter sponsors an Eagle Scout Competition that includes an application detailing Scouting experience, academic achievements, and community service, a 500-word essay on a patriotic theme, and a four-generation genealogy chart. The winner of each SAR chapter competition is entered in the SAR state competition. The winner of each state competition competes in the National Society's Eagle Scout Competition and vies for $14,000 in scholarships.

 

You can read his Essay here.

 

2009 Winning Eagle Patriotic Theme

A Perspective of "Patriot" in the American Revolution
by Gerrit S. Bakker, Eagle Scout
Michigan Society


By definition a patriot is: "one who loves his or her country and supports its authority and interests." Since the early 1600's, people living in the American colonies have had varied interpretations as to the meaning of the word "patriot." The colonists referred to themselves as patriots, but the English referred to them as revolutionaries. Calling these revolutionaries "patriots," is something that historians have done since prior to the Revolutionary War and one which we currently associate with those persons in the colonies who supported the American Revolution.

American colonists used the term "patriot" prior to the Revolutionary War when referring to members of the American Patriot Party. The members of the American Patriot Party, also known as Whigs, Radical Whigs or Patriot Whigs in England, shared similar colonial policies. Though the true meaning of the word "patriot" did not change who the colonists were, it did change with their perspective of their actions. Those early "Patriot Party" colonists in Massachusetts and Virginia during the 1600's referred to those groups who were asserting colonial rights and showed resistance to the directives of the King. The other group was the "Moderate Party," which accepted the King's writ of quo warranto (granting himself authority) on property rights and colonial control. "By this time [1618] there were two distinct parties, not only in the Virginia Company, but in the Virginia Colony, the one being known as the "Court party," the other as the "Patriot party"…In 1619 the Patriot party secured the right for the settlers in Virginia to elect a Representative Assembly…This was the first representative body ever assembled on the American continent. From the first, the representatives began to assert their rights." History has shown that this initial taste of representation only increased the colonist's desire for independence.

The underlying sentiment of emotion and resentment over the decades of being taxed by the British Parliament without appropriate representation and unfair tariffs finally boiled over on December 16, 1773 at the "Boston Tea Party" which is generally considered to be one of the catalysts for the American Revolution. In the span of over one hundred fifty years, from that first elected assembly to the American Revolution, the Patriot Party grew stronger; though not to the point of ever being a majority prior to the war, as noted by John Adams who stated: "One third are Patriots, one third are Loyalists and the rest don't give a damn one way or the other." Though the patriots were initially in the minority, they were clearly a well funded passionate minority that by the end of the war had by most accounts, converted many and become the majority.

In this "Era of Enlightenment (~1660 to 1789)," rational thought and methodical observation by individuals became the primary basis of principles of authority while replacing the "dark ignorance and blind belief that characterized