Rear Admiral Frank Friday Fletcher

 

Rear Admiral Frank Friday Fletcher  (Mexican Campaign -Vera Cruz)

 
Frank Friday Fletcher was born November 23, 1855, in Oskaloosa, IA, and graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1875. After his first cruise on the USS Tuscarora, he was commissioned an Ensign in 1876. In 1878 he participated in a world cruise aboard the USS Ticonderoga under Commodore Robert Wilson Shufeldt. He was later assigned to the Bureau of Ordnance where he developed the Fletcher breech mechanism that increased the speed of rapid-fire guns. 
 
He developed the first doctrines for torpedo warfare while commanding the torpedo boat Cushing in 1893. In 1896 Fletcher was assigned to the battleship USS Maine, but was absent when the ship was blown up in Havana Harbor in February 1898, triggering the Spanish-American War. 
 
In 1910, he was appointed an aide to the Secretary of the Navy. In October 1911 he was promoted to Rear Admiral and until 1913, commanded divisions of the Atlantic Fleet. In September 1914, Admiral Fletcher was named commander of the Atlantic Fleet and served as an Admiral until the completion of that assignment. 
 
As commander of U.S. Naval Forces on the East Coast of Mexico in 1914, he occupied the city of Vera Cruz, and was awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroic leadership. His citation reads “For distinguished conduct in battle, engagements of Vera Cruz, 21 and 22 April 1914. Under fire, Rear Adm. Fletcher was eminent and conspicuous in the performance of his duties; was senior officer present at Vera Cruz, and the landing and the operations of the landing force were carried out under his orders and directions. In connection with these operations, he was at times on shore and under fire.”  Admiral Fletcher was awarded the Medal of Honor on December 4, 1915.
 
After returning to shore duty in June 1916 (returned to the rank of Rear Admiral), he served on the Navy General Board and on the War Industries Board during World War I until his retirement in 1919, earning Distinguished Service Medals from the Navy and the Army for his meritorious service during World War I.  
 
Admiral Fletcher was twice recalled for temporary active duty, and in 1925 sat on a board that explored how aircraft could be most effective in national defense.
 
Frank Friday Fletcher joined the District of Columbia Society in 1909.  His National number is 19721 and his DC Society number is 1096.  He listed his residence as US Navy and occupation as Naval Officer.  His Patriot Ancestor is Ensign Archibald Fletcher who se