Steps to Become a Member of the SAR

The process of becoming a member of the Sons of the American Revolution requires a number of steps:

Note: The SAR does not restrict membership based on race, color, religion, national origin, or nation of citizenship or residency.  Marriage (and its documentation) for the several generations going back to the Patriot Ancestor is desired, but is not a requirement.  Legitimacy in any generation is not a requirement.   Descendants of plural marriages are not excluded from SAR membership.   Bloodline descent -- legitimate or illegitimate -- from a Patriot Ancestor is what is required and is what must be documented.  You must also have two members recommend you for membership.

Your Helper may also provide a copy or you can download one here of an SAR Application Worksheet.   This allows you to collect the information before you prepare the actually application.

If you have a relative in the SAR, DAR, C.A.R., SR, or a similar patriot descendency organization you may be able to save yourself a great deal of effort by submitting their established lineage and documentation for the part of your lineage where your ancestors are the same as your relative's.

If you know that an ancestor was cited in an SAR application or know the name and SAR number of a relative, your Helper may obtain a "record" copy of that application (marked up by the staff genealogist) for a modest fee.

You can request an Ancestor Search or a Member search from the NSSAR Headquarters using the NSSAR Request Form

If NSSAR has applications on file, you will receive the newest application filed on your ancestor.  In case you have asked for an application through a particular child of the Patriot, you will receive that application if available.

There is a similar procedure for requesting DAR application copies.  Please visit their website for instructions: http://www.dar.org

Please check out our Genealogy Resources and SAR Resources for other helpful information which may help you document your lineage.

 

Qualifications for Membership

Any male shall be eligible for regular membership in this Society who:

  • Being of the age of eighteen years (Junior Membership is available) or over and
  • A citizen of good repute in the community,
  • Is the lineal descendant of an ancestor
    • who was at all times unfailing in loyalty to and rendered active service in, the cause of American independence, either as an:
      • officer
      • soldier
      • seaman
      • marine
      • militiaman
      • Minuteman
    • in the armed forces
      • of the Continental Congress
      • of any one of the several Colonies or States
    • A Signer of the Declaration of Independence
    • A member of a Committee of Safety or Correspondence
    • A member of any
      • Continental
      • Provincial
      • Colonial Congress or Legislature
    • or as a recognized patriot who performed actual service by overt acts of resistance to the authority of Great Britain.

Family tradition in regard to the services of an ancestor will not be considered as proof.

No preliminary decision will be given on a line of descent, service or evidentiary value of proposed evidence. (When examined with all available evidence, such preliminary decision might prove to be incorrect and the National Society cannot accept responsibility for such a decision.)

Acceptable Service by a Patriot Ancestor

Participation in one or more of the following types of service is required of an ancestor if a descendent is to be admitted into the Sons of the American Revolution.

 

  • Signer of the Declaration of Independence
  • Member of any of the Continental Congresses
  • Rendering material aid, such as:
    • Furnishing supplies with or without remuneration
    • Lending money to the Colonies, munitions makers, and gunsmiths
    • Any other material aid which furthered the Cause
  • Military or naval service:
    • Service at the Battle of Point Pleasant, October 10, 1774
    • Service from April 19, 1775 to November 26, 1783
    • Furnishing a substitute for military service
  • Members of the
    • Boston Tea Party
    • Kaskaskia Campaign
    • Galvez Expedition
    • Cherokee Expedition
    • Edenton Tea Party
  • Defenders of forts and frontiers; rangers.
  • Prisoners of war, including those on the British ship "Old Jersey," and other prison ships.
  • Physician, surgeon, nurse, or others rendering aid to the wounded.
  • Civil service under the Colonies from April 19, 1775, to November 26, 1783, inclusive
  • Member of committees made necessary by the war, such as
    • Committee of Correspondence
    • Committee of Inspection and Safety
    • Committee to care for soldiers' families
    • or any other Committees which furthered the cause of the Colonies from six months before the Battle of Point Pleasant.
  • Any pledge to support the cause of the Colonies, such as signing the Oath of Fidelity and Support:
    • Oath of Allegiance
    • Articles of Association
    • Association Test
  • Signers of
    • The Mecklenburg Declaration, 1775
    • The Albemarle, Virginia, Declaration
    • The Cumberland Compact
    • and similar declarations.
  • Signers of petitions addressed to and recognizing the authority of the provisional and new state governments.
  • Persons accepting obligations or acting under direction of the provisional and new state governments, such as persons directed to hold elections, to oversee road construction, to collect provisions, etc.
  • Ministers known to be in sympathy with the Colonies, either by sermon, speech, or action.
     

Documenting Your Line

Please understand that discovering and documenting a genealogical line to a Patriot ancestor can often be accomplished with only a modest amount of effort, providing you know what to look for and where to find it.  If you have an ancestor who lived in the United States prior to 1900 chances are likely that you could to be the descendant of a Revolutionary War patriot


The material presented here is excerpt from a talk given by William B. Neal (DESSAR), who has chaired the National SAR Lineage Research and Workshop Committee for many years.   Mr. Neal has a quarter-century of experience in genealogy and he was the Founding President of the Delaware Genealogical Society.  His SAR credentials include receiving the Liberty Medal with several oak leaf clusters (indicating that he has helped dozens of people become members of the SAR thus far).  He has held the National Office of Genealogist General for several terms.

This discussion covers

  1. Documenting Easy Cases:
    1. Relative in the SAR or DAR or CAR
    2. A family tree going back to the Revolution
  2. More Difficult Cases (little or no lineage information):
    1. Recent Generations: Back to 1900
    2. Helpers, IGI, Biographical Sketches
    3. The Census: 1920 to 1850
    4. Wills and Deeds: before 1850

NOTE: Please read through this material.  It will help you get a basic understanding of how to look for genealogical information and as you become more experienced at finding information you will become a treasured resource for your local Chapter and State Society.  Enjoy the fastest growing hobby in the United States.

NOTE: The primary focus of this resource is getting the documentation needed for an SAR application, so it does not cover immigration records or many other fascinating aspects of researching your ancestry.

 

Documenting Easy Cases

AN EASY CASE - A RELATIVE IN THE SAR/DAR/CAR

 

First, let's take the easiest case.  If the prospect has a relative in the SAR, DAR, or CAR, then the Patriot ancestor's name and service and most of the lineage has already been determined and documented.  All the prospect needs is documentation of the relationship to the relative and a "record copy" of the SAR, DAR or CAR application.  While an SAR record copy is already on file at headquarters, the Chapter and State Registrars may wish to check the present application against the one on file to be sure the dates and names are copied accurately.   A son typically needs only his own birth certificate, his parents' marriage license, and a record copy of his father's (or mother's) application.  An SAR Chapter or State Society officer can request record copies from the SAR, DAR, or CAR; the cost is estimated to be about $10.

For more information concerning the DAR and its procedures visit their web site at: http://www.dar.org/


A FAMILY TREE, BUT WAS THE ANCESTOR A PATRIOT?

 

Suppose the prospect has a family tree or a family story about an ancestor who was here during the Revolutionary War era, but isn't sure whether he (or she) might qualify as a Patriot ancestor.  First remember that for the purposes of the SAR a Patriot ancestor is someone...

Who was at all times unfailing in loyalty to, and rendered active service in the cause of American Independence either as an officer, soldier, seaman, marine, militiaman or minuteman, in the armed forces of the Continental Congress of any one of the several Colonies or States, as a signer of the Declaration of Independence, as a member of a Committee of Safety or Correspondence, as a member of any Continental, Provincial, or Colonial Congress or Legislature, as a foreign national of, but not limited to, France, Germany, Poland, Spain, Sweden or Switzerland who rendered service in the cause of American Independence or as a recognized patriot who performed actual service by overt acts of resistance to the authority of Great Britain

     -- Article 2 SAR Constitution

Other organizations may require military service, but the SAR and DAR do not.   People who served in local governments, signed oaths of allegiance, or provided food or clothing or services to the American Army are acceptable as Patriot ancestors.
Here are the first places you should look:

The SAR Patriot Index (a CD-database that can be searched using a computer) lists thousands of patriot ancestors who have been claimed and documented by members of the SAR.  A find here means that at least some of the prospect's lineage has already been documented, so they will have to document only the more recent generations.

The SAR Revolutionary War Graves Register (either book or CD-database) lists the burial places of tens of thousands of persons who are documented as patriots.

The DAR Patriot Index (3 volumes) lists tens of thousands of patriot ancestors who have been claimed and documented by members of the DAR.  This does NOT tell you who claimed them as ancestors nor what the DAR member's national number is.

The DAR Lineage Books (150 volumes) provide the full lineage for women who joined the DAR before about 1935.   The listing includes their DAR numbers.  These books are available in many public libraries.

Ancestry.com has put these DAR lineages online with an excellent search feature, but this Web database is open only to subscribers to Ancestry.com.

Another place to look is in state or county listings of Revolutionary War Patriots.  These are probably available at the appropriate county's historical society.  NOTE: The SAR is starting a project to compile these in a single place, but there are no records here at present.   Here are a few of the references (we shall add more later):

  • "Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors in the Revolution"
  • "Connecticut Soldiers in the Revolution"
  • "Delaware Archives Military", whose information has recently been extracted and tabulated by Henry Peden (MDSSAR) in "Military Records:  Revolutionary War Patriots of Delaware" in print and as a CD-database (Family Line Publications)
  • Maryland information for many (but not all) counties has recently been extracted and tabulated by Henry Peden (MDSSAR) in "Military Records:  Revolutionary War Patriots of Maryland" in print and as a CD-database (Family Line Publications)
  • NOTE:  Many other (east-coast) states have similar books, we shall get the names here before long.

However, don't give up if you don't find your ancestor listed above.  Many of these include only people active in military activities.  Find out what your ancestor did during the Revolution and then we can discuss how it fits with the SAR criteria for patriotic service.

 

Documenting Difficult Cases

Documenting Difficult Cases: Some heavy Lifiting may be requried

Not everyone has an easy case, where a family member has already done a lot of the research, some individuals may need to do some of the research themselves.  Do not fear, these days, it is becoming easier to find the documents that you need, and below we provide a list of resources for you to start with.


OK, maybe you don't have a family tree, but the family believes that it goes "way back" or you think it might because you don't know for a fact that all your ancestors came to this country recently.  Where to start? ....

When you have run out of leads from the items list on the other pages you will have to get into the items shown below.  This may be more that you want to do, especially if the information has to come from another state....

From the census you can get get year of birth (by subtracting the person's age -- or age bracket -- from the census date) and sometimes the parents names, the state where the person was born, and the states where the person's parents were born.   Census records are available ....

County and town records may be your best bet for documenting family relationships and dates prior to the 1850 census.  While the originals are filed in county courthouses or record centers, it is often easier and more efficient....

 

Recent Generations: Back to 1900

STARTING NOW AND GOING BACK TO 1900

OK, maybe you don't have a family tree, but the family believes that it goes "way back" or you think it might because you don't know for a fact that all your ancestors came to this country recently.  Where to start?

FAMILY ARCHIVES: Interview the older members of your family to see what they know the names of their forebears and the dates and places of their births, marriages, and deaths.   If your grandmother knows the name of her grandmother, you can write a family tree going back five generations.  This will get you into the mid-1800s.

Older relatives may also have documents or scrapbooks that show the names of ancestors and the dates they were born, got married, and died, deeds, wills, etc.   Family bibles may be acceptable as documentation, and they are valuable because they often list many generations.  Be sure to copy the page that lists the publisher and the date of publication.  These items are often thrown out (when the owner dies) by descendants who do not realize the value of keeping such documents.   Try to get the originals or copies into a safe place while there is yet time.   Also, get a copy for your files.  Possiable sources of documentation include:

  • Wills
  • Birth Certificates
  • Death Certificates
  • Marriage Certificates
  • Family Bibles 


NOTE:  The SAR does not require certified copies of these documents; "xerox" copies are satisfactory.

FAMILY HISTORIES: are available for many surnames (your family name, the Smith of John Smith).  These are available at genealogical or historical libraries, college and public libraries, and lineage society libraries.  Except for the lineage societies, libraries generally cover only families in the local area.   The Library of Congress has a huge collection of family histories and publishes an index which is available in many large libraries. 

NOTE:   When you copy pages from a book, be sure to also copy the title page and see that it contains the title, publisher, city of publication, and date of publication.   Sometimes you have to copy two pages to get all this.

The Census Records: 1930 to 1850

The United States Census Records: 1930 to 1850

 

FEDERAL CENSUSES (and mortality schedules):
From the census you can get get year of birth (by subtracting the person's age -- or age bracket -- from the census date) and sometimes the parents names, the state where the person was born, and the states where the person's parents were born.   Census records are available on microfilm at the ten federal Branch Archives and at the larger genealogical libraries (SAR, DAR).  Some censuses are becoming available on CD-databases.  Some libraries may order a reel of census film for you for a reasonable charge -- but you have to know what you want (the indexes note the roll on which the name appears).

NOTE: When you copy a record, note on the back of the copy the year, state, microfilm roll, and frame or city, ward, and page (and note that some pages bear multiple numbers).   You may make a pencil mark (ON THE COPY ONLY) to help the reader find your ancestor's name.

What's in the Federal Census?  It has varied from one to the next.

1790 ORIGINAL WAS DESTROYED when the British burned Washington DC in 1812, was reconstructed from local records, names only the family head, indexed:

  • 1800 names only the family head, indexed
  • 1810 names only the family head, indexed
  • 1820 names only the family head, indexed
  • 1830 names only the family head, indexed
  • 1840 names only the family head, indexed
  • 1850 all family members, every-person index
  • 1860 all family members, every-person index
  • 1870 all family members, every-person index
  • 1880 all family members, Soundex index covers only households with a child under the age of ten
  • 1890 RUINED IN A FIRE, what is left is only a few whole states and a few counties in other states, all family members
  • 1900 all family members, Soundex index
  • 1910 all family members, Soundex index only for some states
  • 1920 all family members, Soundex index
  • 1930 all family members, Soundex index

Whoa! What's a Soundex Index? It's better than a regular alphabetic index because the names are listed according to how they sound, and since census takers often mis-spelled names according to how they sounded, it is easier to use a Soundex system than to look up all the variants of spelling for Frey (Fry, Frei, Frye, Fray, Fries, etc.).  We won't describe it here, but it is easy to get the Soundex codes for the few names you will be looking up.  After that you don't need to worry about it.

The National Archives are in Washington DC, and there are ten Branch Archives are located in Waltham MA, New York NY, Philadelphia PA, East Point GA, Chicago IL, Kansas City MO, Fort Worth TX, Denver CO, San Bruno CA, and Seattle WA.

If you don't find the person in the index don't give up.  Names were mis-spelled and left out of the index, but if you know the person's approximate address you can determine the census ward that they lived in and do a name-by-name search of the microfilm of that ward's census records.  The records were generally taken in a house-by-house order down each street, and the streets are sometimes noted on the census forms, making your search easier.

What's the mortality schedule?  This is a listing of all the deaths that occurred during the year immediately preceding the decade census year.   Deaths in the other nine years are NOT listed.  While this list misses 90% of the deaths, it does cover the other 10%, and that might have just the information you need.

STATE CENSUSES:  Many states conducted a census in-between the federal censuses.  These provide comparable information and are often overlooked.
 

Many of these census indexes can be found online at ancestry.com or footnote.com.  If you do not have a membership, check with your local library, they may provide access to these services at the branch.

Wills and Deeds: before 1850

Wills and Deeds: before 1850

County and town records may be your best bet for documenting family relationships and dates prior to the 1850 census.  While the originals are filed in county courthouses or record centers, it is often easier and more efficient to look at the indices and abstracts (and often the microfilm copies) that are available at county or state history or genealogical libraries and local college libraries.   Many of these are becoming available through the Internet or on CD-databases.   Libraries are now collecting these CD-databases and making them available to the public.  It's a whole lot easier to do genealogical research now than twenty years ago.

DEEDS document land transfers and document whether the participant was alive or dead ("for the estate of").  Originals are generally filed with the county, but books of abstracts and microfilm of the originals may be more widely available.  They may note a chain of inheritance and death dates in reciting the history of the tract, or indicate a nominal price for a sale within the family (essentially a bequest prior to death or an exchange for lifetime support of an elder family member).  They may also indicate the use of land as security for in intra-family loan.  Even if it does not note a family relationship it serves to document a name and location and that a person was alive at the time.   The deed is not helpful for documenting a family relationship if the relationship is not stated, but it can serve as circumstantial proof of such a relationship.
NOTE: When you copy a page, note on the back of the copy where you got it -- the name of the book (and publisher and date).  You may make a pencil mark (ON THE COPY ONLY) to help the reader find your ancestor's name.

PROBATE FILES contain the copy of the will (along with the date it was written) that was filed after a person's death.  The will generally names the wife (if living) and all living children, and it may name grandchildren (especially if the parent has died), siblings, nephews, and nieces.  A disinherited child may be left out of the will, but that child may show up in another relative's will.  Originals are filed with the county, but books of abstracts and microfilm of the originals may be more widely available.

ORPHANS' COURT RECORDS cover cases where a person died intestate, a minor child was orphaned and had to be assigned to foster parents, or a will was contested.   Letters of administration may be issued to appoint someone to settle the estate, a valuation of the estate may be filed, and finally a court order for dividing the estate among the heirs.

NOTE: When you copy a page, note on the back of the copy where you got it -- the name of the book (and publisher and date).

LISTS OF TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS (many recorded in the 1930s) may provide information about family cemeteries that no longer exist, before cemeteries kept good records, or in case the cemetery information was lost.  WARNING:   Mis-reading of dates and names is common, so if it looks wrong, it may be wrong.

NOTE: When you copy a page, note on the back of the copy where you got it -- the name of the book (and publisher and date).  You may make a pencil mark (ON THE COPY ONLY) to help the reader find your ancestor's name.  In case of suspected error you may note ON THE COPY next to (for example) "1747" your comment, "other sources support 1774".

TAX RECORDS may document that a person was alive or dead ("for the estate of") as well as the town in which they were living.  These may be state, county, or local taxes. The older records are primarily property tax records.

NOTE: When you copy a page, note on the back of the copy where you got it -- the name of the book (and publisher and date).  You may make a pencil mark (ON THE COPY ONLY) to help the reader find your ancestor's name.

Helpers, IGI, Biographical Sketches

HIRE A HELPER: When you have run out of leads from the items list on the other pages you will have to get into the items shown below.  This may be more that you want to do, especially if the information has to come from another state.   It can cost a lot to visit a distant state to do research using records and libraries with which you are not familiar.  Local genealogical researchers can provide an efficient alternative.  Genealogical magazines (available at local genelaogical societies) and local genealogical researchers can help you get contact information for a researcher who is familiar with the records you seek.   Email makes the contact and exchange of information fast and inexpensive.

THE LDS AND IGI: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (LDS, often callen the Mormons) has the largest collection of genealogical source material in the world.   They have microfilmed records in churches, government files, and private collections all over the world, and they have kindly made this information available to the entire community without charge.  Family relationships between tens of millions of people have been placed in the International Genealogical Index (IGI).   A CAUTION:  In the enthusiasm to find relationships between many people links were sometimes assumed that are not supported by documentation.   Since several transcriptions of data were involved in producing the IGI names, dates, and places were sometimes mispelt or swapped.  So while IGI is a valuable resource to get you started on research it has a fair number of errors and is not acceptable as documentation.

You may either search for your ancestor in IGI on the LDS Web site or visit a local LDS family history center and use their microfilm or CD-databases to see if they have information on the parents of or additional information about a known ancestor.   The microfilm that contains further information about that ancestor is noted on the index listing.  You may rent that film for use (over several weeks) at the local center for a nominal charge.  Beyond the IGI information there is microfilmed information on virtually all the types of source noted on the present page.  Even if you can't afford to visit fifteen records centers in Michigan, you can order from the LDS microfilms containing the deeds, family histories, probate records, census lists, church baptismal records, tombstome listings, etc. that you want to search.

Be sure to make the copies that you need for documenting your application.   Handwritten summaries are not acceptable documentation.

NOTE:  When you copy a record, note on the back of the copy the year, state, microfilm roll, and frame or city, ward, and page (and note that You may make a pencil mark (ON THE COPY ONLY) to help the reader find your ancestor's name.

CHECK A GENEALOGIST'S GUIDE TO RECORDS: There are several (thick) books that tell you what is available and where to find it in every county and state in the nation.  This will probably reveal sources you had not thought of and keep you from hoping to find sources that do not exist.  It tells when state censuses were taken (in-between federal censuses), when vital records began to be required in the state, whether biographical histories are available for the county, the addresses to write for information, when the county was founded and what county covered the area previously (records remain with the county which was in existence at the time the record was made), etc.

You may find these books at a local library, college library, historical society, or genealogical society.  Several popular books of this sort are:

  • "The Source"
  • "Vital Records Handbook" by Thomas Kemp
  • "The Handy Book for Genealogists" (Everton Publ. Co., Logan UT)
  • "Compendium of Historical Sources", by Ronald Bremer (Progenitor Gen. Soc., Salt Lake City UT, 1983 etc.)
  • "Ancestry's Redbook"

NOTE: We plan to get full citations here shortly.

Most of these have been published in several editions, and while the later ones are more comprehensive, the information in the earlier editions should generally be accurate.

CHECK ON-LINE RESOURCES:
Several major starting points may be found on our Genealogical Resources page.

VITAL RECORDS (birth, marriage, and death records):  For many years states have required hospitals, clergy, and doctors to report these and have recorded them in state record centers.  Some states (or towns) started this practice in the 1600s, others started as late as the early 1900s.  The records are usually kept at and are available for viewing at a Bureau of Vital Statistics or the Health Department.

NOTE: Be sure to get the "long form" of a birth certificate (or other certificates).   The "short form" simply confirms the birthdate, place, and name.  The "long form" has the names of the parents and perhaps even more information such as their ages and birthplaces.

The ease and cost of viewing or getting copies of these records varies from state to state.  In some states (such as New Jersey) you can phone the vital records office, ask them to copy a specific record, and give a credit card number to pay for the copy and for mailing it to you -- and you will have it in ten days.   However many states require that you write in to get a form, then send in the form with a check, then wait several weeks.  If you do not know how the name was spelled and the exact year of the event it may be difficult or expensive to locate the record.

Note that death certificates may be especially helpful by having in addition to the date and place of death, the date and place of birth, the spouse or a child's name (as next of kin), and the parents' names and places of birth.

CHURCH, CEMETERY, and FUNERAL DIRECTOR RECORDS:

These records often provide excellent name, date, place, and relationship information on family groupings over three or more generations.  Women sometimes went to their mothers' homes for their first birth.  Members of the same family were often baptized (or christened), married, and participated in activities at the same church for many generations.   At death they had memorial services there and used familiar funeral parlors to arrange for burial in family plots.  So the names of relatives may be found with records for the deceased.

NOTE: When you copy a record, note on the back of the copy where you got it -- the name of the book (and publisher and date) or the file folder and the record center where you got it.  You may make a pencil mark (ON THE COPY ONLY) to help the reader find your ancestor's name.

FRATERNAL ASSOCIATIONS, MILITARY RECORDS, COLLEGE RECORDS:
These may provide information on birthdate and place, parents' names, and links to other records about the parents. The names and ethnic affiliations of many fraternal organizations are listed in the genealogy source books noted above.  Some of the older, larger ones are B'nai B'rith, Elks, Free Masons, Hibernians, Knights of Columbus, Knights of Pythias, Masons, Odd Fellows, and Red Men.

COUNTY BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORIES: were very popular in the 1890s.   A large percent of the nation's people had immigrated or moved to new states (sometimes several times) in recent times and they wanted to record their ancestors, previous homes, and present occupations for the benefit of their descendants -- US (And aren't you glad they did, and don't you want to leave a similar record for your descendants?).   While the extended biographies and woodcut portraits were printed only for those who could and chose to afford them, they often provide listings of everyone in town.   These are available at county or state history or genealogical libraries and local college libraries.

NOTE: When you copy pages from a book, be sure to also copy the title page and see that it contains the title, publisher, city of publication, and date of publication.   Sometimes you have to copy two pages to get all this.

CITY DIRECTORIES were the phone directories of their day.  They helped deliverymen and friends locate the homes of residents and provided a means for advertizing the products and services of local firms.  They provide circumstantial evidence that a person was alive and living at a certain address.   Death dates may be inferred from a dropped listing or a change in listing from John Smith to Jane Smith, widow of John.

NOTE: When you copy pages from a book, be sure to also copy the title page and see that it contains the title, publisher, city of publication, and date of publication.   Sometimes you have to coppy two pages to get all this.  You may make a pencil mark (ON THE COPY ONLY) to help the reader find your ancestor's name.

 

SAR Application Program Choices

 

Application Programs

Now that you have traced your lineage, and collected your documents, the next step in the process is the preparation of the actual application to the SAR.  The preparation of the application may be done by a genealogy Helper, Chapter or State Registrar, or you can do it yourself.

There are currently several methods in which you can prepare a SAR Application, some of which include Software applications.  We have listed them below.  Each one offers a different method to complete the application.

This is a PDF file that allows the user to produce an application form that is (within the limits of the printer being used) very similar to the current pre-printed NSSAR Membership Application Form, Form #0915.  The form and data can be saved to your hard drive for editing later or to use when filing a Supplemental Application which uses much of the same lineage. Remember to use the "Save As" Command, and change the name of the file.

This is a program written by Compatriot Cox (TX) that assists in the preparation of a SAR Application.

  • Online Application preparation

The NSSAR is currently working an online Application Submission tool that you can use to prepare applications.  We are working hard on getting this ready, and it should be available soon.  Check back for more details.

 


 

Below are is of the basic information regarding the defaults for all applications submitted to the NSSAR, regardless of how they are prepared.

  • All applications are required to be printed on a special 8.5 by 14 inch SAR watermarked paper.  This paper is available from the SAR Merchandise Department and is listed as catalog number #0917 Blank Archival Paper.  Please visit the SAR Merchandise online catalog for a supply.

 

  • The text format for the forms should be Times New Roman in a normal print, NOT bold typeface.

 

  • The data entered onto the form may be in Helvetica or Times Roman or Courier and in either normal or bold typeface.

 

NOTE:  The National Headquarters will return any application whose text, logo or data are badly printed.  Since new applicants are usually not familiar with what a properly printed form looks like, Chapter and State Society individuals who are involved with the application process should watch for problem applications.
 

SARApAid by Cox Software

Cox Software
SARApAid by Ray Cox (TX)



This program has been licensed as an approved NSSAR Application form software package.  It is a stand-alone program (for Win95, Win98, WinMe, WinNT 3.51+, Win2000, WinXP, Vista, and Windows 7) requiring no other application or software package to provide complete entry, editing, saving, recall, and printing of NSSAR Application forms #0915U (2003 - new Universal form), #0915Y (2000 - Youth/Youth Life Membership form), as well as exchanging form data via E-mail attachments.

Further information on the program, e.g., cost ($20 delivered, including free program upgrades via Internet download for 2 years), and DEMO downloads are available at the Cox SoftWare Web site, http://www.coxsoftware.com

Note: The Cox program is the only one of the programs offered which can import form data from sources other than its native file formats.   Compatriot Cox has incorporated the capability to import form data from each of the other approved programs in support of the NSSAR Patriot Index Project.   Please see the Cox Software web site for further details.